Anonymous said: Becuase if you, I just showed my little brother an episode of SH22. Upside: I think he's getting into it. Downside: He won't stop following me around and singing the theme song.

This makes me ridiculously happy.

SPREAD THE GLORY THAT IS SH22.

Tags: wine drinking

Tags: vocabulary

"It seems to me now that the plain state of being human is dramatic enough for anyone; you don’t need to be a heroin addict or a performance poet to experience extremity. You just have to love someone."

— Nick Hornby, How to Be Good (via observando)

(via the-wandering-wanderer)

massiv3:

so when are we gonna stop pretending beer tastes good

but it does

(via the-wandering-wanderer)

frioni:

Okay, I’m sorry but I just HAVE TO SAY IT.
I love the 1984 Sherlock because of this guy. Out of all the sherlock actors, even if I haven’t seen them all, I believe he’s the best one. If you ever read his bio it’s just heartbreaking.
So before he took the sherlock role, he was already a distinguished actor. But he truly committed to playing sherlock. Like the people he works with comments that he sort of became sherlock.. Until eventually it took over him. Jeremy Brett died before finishing the TV series, but he was already too sick and being casted out anyways. But apparently by becoming the character sherlock has psychologically taken him over.. Like he had personal problems and being sherlock Holmes didn’t help that (if you know what I mean). I suggest any sherlock Holmes fan to read up on his bio because it’s moving. Like he is seriously dedicated on becoming sherlock. He read of all Conan Doyle’s books and even wrote like mannerisms and habits of sherlock and practiced them. I remember reading that his wife died and got him really depressed and that he was also a bisexual actor. Okay I’m done. Sorry

Playing Holmes didn’t really take him over, although Jeremy sometimes claimed that. That’s a sort of fandom myth perpetrated by The Man Who Became Sherlock Holmes, which is apparently a rather sensationalist semi-biography which presents only one side of the story.
Jeremy was manic depressive, and was never treated for it until his hospitalization after the filming of Granada’s third season. That’s when things actually started going downhill.
Yes, Sherlock Holmes was a tough role. He had to film several hour-length episodes in one stretch of time, during which he had to memorize as many lines as everyone else in the episode put together. Not to mention his stance of “stay true to Doyle,” which he was fighting the producers on from the beginning, and which didn’t stop until his health declined too far for him to keep it up. (Hence the weirdness of the later episodes.)
But Jeremy had scarred lungs from a childhood illness, and he was a chain smoker, sometimes smoking six packets of cigarettes in a day. He later regretted this, but at the time, it was his way of dealing with stress. He started taking medication for his bipolar disorder, and the medication caused him to retain water, giving him the slightly bloated, unnaturally heavy appearance that started in season 4 and worsened as time progressed.
But it’s important to note that, in the end, Jeremy still enjoyed playing Holmes, still enjoyed what the role had brought to his life. Certainly, without Granada, Jeremy would not have discovered his own Watson in Edward Hardwicke, and when playing Holmes on stage in The Secret of Sherlock Holmes, he said on-camera that they were having a ball.
I guess my point is, don’t just read the Wikipedia article and call it good. Dig deeper. Find what other people who knew Jeremy, met him, saw him, have to say about him. Watch the interviews on YouTube. Heck, go get Bending the Willow on Kindle—it’s a read that will break your heart but will also tell you far more about Granada and Jeremy than you can learn online.
Jeremy Brett was a complicated man with a complicated life who played a complicated character in a complicated series. (True facts, all of those complications.) The myth that Sherlock Holmes “took him over” is doing a disservice both to actor and character.

frioni:

Okay, I’m sorry but I just HAVE TO SAY IT.

I love the 1984 Sherlock because of this guy. Out of all the sherlock actors, even if I haven’t seen them all, I believe he’s the best one. If you ever read his bio it’s just heartbreaking.

So before he took the sherlock role, he was already a distinguished actor. But he truly committed to playing sherlock. Like the people he works with comments that he sort of became sherlock.. Until eventually it took over him. Jeremy Brett died before finishing the TV series, but he was already too sick and being casted out anyways.
But apparently by becoming the character sherlock has psychologically taken him over.. Like he had personal problems and being sherlock Holmes didn’t help that (if you know what I mean).
I suggest any sherlock Holmes fan to read up on his bio because it’s moving. Like he is seriously dedicated on becoming sherlock. He read of all Conan Doyle’s books and even wrote like mannerisms and habits of sherlock and practiced them.
I remember reading that his wife died and got him really depressed and that he was also a bisexual actor.
Okay I’m done.
Sorry

Playing Holmes didn’t really take him over, although Jeremy sometimes claimed that. That’s a sort of fandom myth perpetrated by The Man Who Became Sherlock Holmes, which is apparently a rather sensationalist semi-biography which presents only one side of the story.

Jeremy was manic depressive, and was never treated for it until his hospitalization after the filming of Granada’s third season. That’s when things actually started going downhill.

Yes, Sherlock Holmes was a tough role. He had to film several hour-length episodes in one stretch of time, during which he had to memorize as many lines as everyone else in the episode put together. Not to mention his stance of “stay true to Doyle,” which he was fighting the producers on from the beginning, and which didn’t stop until his health declined too far for him to keep it up. (Hence the weirdness of the later episodes.)

But Jeremy had scarred lungs from a childhood illness, and he was a chain smoker, sometimes smoking six packets of cigarettes in a day. He later regretted this, but at the time, it was his way of dealing with stress. He started taking medication for his bipolar disorder, and the medication caused him to retain water, giving him the slightly bloated, unnaturally heavy appearance that started in season 4 and worsened as time progressed.

But it’s important to note that, in the end, Jeremy still enjoyed playing Holmes, still enjoyed what the role had brought to his life. Certainly, without Granada, Jeremy would not have discovered his own Watson in Edward Hardwicke, and when playing Holmes on stage in The Secret of Sherlock Holmes, he said on-camera that they were having a ball.

I guess my point is, don’t just read the Wikipedia article and call it good. Dig deeper. Find what other people who knew Jeremy, met him, saw him, have to say about him. Watch the interviews on YouTube. Heck, go get Bending the Willow on Kindle—it’s a read that will break your heart but will also tell you far more about Granada and Jeremy than you can learn online.

Jeremy Brett was a complicated man with a complicated life who played a complicated character in a complicated series. (True facts, all of those complications.) The myth that Sherlock Holmes “took him over” is doing a disservice both to actor and character.

homebeccer:

"oh my god stop criticizing young girls who like 50 Shades of Gray or Twilight you can’t tell them what they can and can’t read"

no we can’t but we have to protect young girls from mistaking abusive behavior for genuine affection at all costs

(via the-wandering-wanderer)

Anonymous said: What is 50 shades of grey about? And what's so bad about it?

valeria2067:

middleclassreject:

dysonrules:

aconissa:

50 Shades of Grey was originally fanfiction based on the Twilight series, which was then published as a novel (along with 2 subsequent books). It sold over 100 million copies around the world and topped best-seller lists everywhere. It’s about to be adapted into a film, set to come out early next year.

It follows a college student named Ana Steele, who enters a relationship with a man named Christian Grey and is then introduced to a bastardised and abusive parody of BDSM culture.

While the book is paraded as erotica, the relationship between Ana and Christian is far from healthy. The core mantra of the BDSM community is “safe, sane and consensual”, and 50 Shades is anything but. None of the rules of BDSM practices (which are put in place to protect those involved) are actually upheld. Christian is controlling, manipulative, abusive, takes complete advantage of Ana, ignores safe-words, ignores consent, keeps her uneducated about the sexual practices they’re taking part in, and a multitude of other terrible things. Their relationship is completely sickening and unhealthy.

Basically, “the book is a glaring glamorisation of violence against women,” as Amy Bonomi so perfectly put it. 

It’s terrible enough that a book like this has been absorbed by people worldwide. Now, we have a film that is expected to be a huge box-office success, and will likely convince countless more young women that it’s okay not to have any autonomy in a relationship, that a man is allowed to control them entirely. It will also show many young men that women are theirs to play with and dominate, thus contributing to antiquated patriarchal values and rape culture.

REBLOG FOREVER.

Boycott this f***ing movie, for the love of god. These kinds of ideas are dangerous and set us back as a society 

Boycott, boycott, boycott. As said above, BDSM is not the problem. It is also not present in 50 Shades. 50 Shades is abuse; it is not BDSM.

"Don’t use metaphors in fantasy; your readers will take them literally. Or they may take them figuratively — but if so, they’ll also take your magics and transformations figuratively. Either way, you’re in trouble."

— Teresa Nielsen Hayden (via writingquotes)